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Second Bronze Star awarded to METC Instructor
By Lisa Braun, Medical Education and Training Campus Public Affairs - lisa.c.braun.civ@mail.mil

November 4, 2011
Air Force Maj. Christopher Gonzales was awarded his second Bronze Star on Oct. 28 for exceptionally meritorious service in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while deployed to Afghanistan in 2009. Gonzales, a medical logistics instructor at the Medical Education & Training Campus (METC), was presented the award by Col. Annata Sullivan, 937th Training Group (TRG) Commander. The 937th TRG is the Air Force component that supports METC. (U.S. Air Force photo/Released)
Photo courtesy U.S. Air Force
Air Force Maj. Christopher Gonzales was awarded his second Bronze Star on Oct. 28 for exceptionally meritorious service in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while deployed to Afghanistan in 2009. Gonzales, a medical logistics instructor at the Medical Education & Training Campus (METC), was presented the award by Col. Annata Sullivan, 937th Training Group (TRG) Commander. The 937th TRG is the Air Force component that supports METC.
FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas -
Air Force Maj. Christopher Gonzales, a medical logistics instructor at the Medical Education & Training Campus (METC), was awarded his second Bronze Star for exceptionally meritorious service in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while deployed to Afghanistan in 2009.

Joined by his wife Beth and son Evan, Gonzales was presented the award during a commander's call on Oct. 28 by Col. Annata Sullivan, 937th Training Group (TRG) Commander. The 937th TRG is the Air Force component that supports METC.

"Major Gonzales is a great instructor. We are very proud of him and his willingness to deploy and serve his country," Sullivan said.

While deployed with the 1ST Squadron, 108TH Cavalry Regiment, then-Capt. Gonzales oversaw 21 medical evacuation missions, attaining a 100 percent survival rate; planned medical support for Joint Forces/Joint Nation Operation BREST THUNDER; managed 52 medical mentors across the Afghan Central region; and planned and implemented three Afghan medical outreach missions resulting in 400 local citizens receiving treatment.

Despite his accomplishments, Gonzales remains humble. "I didn't go above and beyond. I did what was expected of me; I accomplished the mission," he said.

His leadership thought otherwise.

"Captain Gonzales' personal courage and commitment to mission accomplishment in a combat zone, under the most extreme of circumstances, greatly contributed to the success of Operation Enduring Freedom," reads his citation.

Sullivan agrees, but added that Gonzales' family should be praised, as well as his co-workers who stayed behind to continue the mission.

"We always appreciate the family's service and are proud that our Air Force family is willing to share the burden when their loved one deploys.

"Families," she said, "are what make our Armed Forces so resilient."